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ApoLogix SR-FMK

ApoLogix SR-FMK Cell Technology Caspase / Apoptosis Detection
ApoLogix SR-FMK
Sulforhodamine Caspase Detection Kit™

$175.00$525.00

in stock
Product code: SR100
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Product Description

Key Benefits

  • Non-cytotoxic assay arrests further apoptotic activity via caspase inhibition.
  • Cell permeablity permits direct visualization of cytosolic apoptotic events.
  • Apoptotic cell population does not diminish over time.
  • Add reagent directly to cells. No special buffer or media needed. No preparation of cell lysates required. Simple wash procedure.
  • Works in diverse cell lines: human, rodent, Drosophila.
  • Can be performed in conjunction with Annexin staining, TUNEL, antibody staining, or with other APO LOGIX reagents on the same population of cells.
  • Permits high through-put screening. Protocol can be adapted for ex vivo as well as in situ experiments.
  • Applications – Works with fluorescence microscope, 96-well fluorescence plate readers
  • Yields both quantitative and qualitative results. Gives strong signal with little background noise.

Assay Principle

APO LOGIX SR kits contain a generic sulforhodamine labeled caspase inhibitor (sulforhodamine-peptide-fluoromethyl ketone). This reagent is cell permeable and is used on whole cells to detect apoptosis. Apoptotic cells are detected by a fluorescence plate reader or fluorescence microscope using an excitation source at 550nm and measuring emission at 595nm. The assay takes about 1 hr to complete
APO LOGIX Sulforhodamine

Jurkat cells stimulated with staurosporine for 2 hours and then labeled with SR-VAD-FMK.

Left side: 30X phase contrast

Right side: 30X fluorescence microscope. Excitation: 550nm emission > 580nm.
APO LOGIX Sulforhodamine

Jurkat cells stimulated with staurosporine for 2 hours. Cells were then stained with SR-VAD-FMK for 1 hour and read in a 96 well fluorescence plate reader.

References

  • Slee, E. A., C. Adrain, and S. J. Martin. 1999. Serial Killers: ordering caspase activation events in apoptosis. Cell Death and Differ. 6:1067-1074.
  • Walker, N. P., R. V. Talanian, K. D. Brady, L. C. Dang, N. J. Bump, C. R. Ferenz, S. Franklin, T. Ghayur, M. C. Hackett and L. D. Hammill. 1994. Crystal Structure of the Cysteine Protease Interleukin-1ß-Converting Enzyme: A (p20/p10)2 Homodimer. Cell 78:343-352.
  • Wilson, K. P., J. F. Black, J. A. Thomson, E. E. Kim, J. P. Griffith, M. A. Navia, M. A. Murcko, S. P. Chambers, R. A. Aldape, S. A. Raybuck, and D. J. Livingston. 1994. Structure and mechanism of interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme. Nature 370: 270-275.
  • Rotonda, J., D. W. Nicholson, K. M. Fazil, M. Gallant, Y. Gareau, M. Labelle, E. P. Peterson, D. M. Rasper, R. Ruel, J. P. Vaillancourt, N. A. Thornberry and J. W. Becker. 1996. The three-dimensional structure of apopain/CPP32, a key mediator of apoptosis. Nature Struct. Biol. 3(7): 619-625.
  • Kumar, S. 1999. Mechanisms mediating caspase activation in cell death. Cell Death and Differ. 6: 1060-1066.
  • Thornberry, N. A., T. A. Rano, E. P. Peterson, D. M. Rasper, T. Timkey, M. Garcia-Calvo, V. M. Houtszager, P. A. Nordstrom, S. Roy, J. P. Vaillancourt, K. T. Chapman and D. W. Nicholson. 1997. A combinatorial approach defines specificities of members of the caspase SRily and granzyme B. Functional relationships established for key mediators of apoptosis. J. Biol. Chem. 272(29): 17907-17911.
  • Amstad, P.A., G.L. Johnson, B.W. Lee and S. Dhawan. 2000. An in situ marker for the detection of activated caspases. Biotechnology Laboratory 18: 52-56.
  • Bedner, E., P. Smolewski, P.A. Amstad and Z. Darzynkiewicz. 2000. Activation of caspases measured in situ by binding or fluorochrome-labeled inhibitors of caspases (FLICA): correlation with DNA fragmentation. Exp. Cell Research 259: 308-313.
  • Smolewski, P., E. Bedner, L. Du, T.-C. Hsieh, J. Wu, J. D. Phelps and Z. Darzynkiewicz. 2001. Detection of caspase activation by fluorochrome-labeled inhibitors: multiparameter analysis by laser scanning cytometry. Cytometry 44: 73-82.
  • Ekert, P. G., J. Silke and D. L. Vaux. 1999. Caspase inhibitors. Cell Death and Differ. 6:1081-1086.
  • Carcia-Calvo, M., E. Peterson, B. Leiting, R. Ruel, D. Nicholson and N. Thornberry. 1998. Inhibition of human caspases by peptide-based and macromolecular inhibitors. J. Biol. Chem. 273: 32608-32613.
  • Hirata, H., A. Takahashi, S. Kobayashi, S. Yonehara, H. Sawai, T. Okazaki, K. Yamamoto and M. Sasada. 1998. Caspases are activated in a branched protease cascade and control distinct downstream processes in Fas-induced apoptosis. J. Exp. Med. 187: 587-600

Kit contents and Long Term storage

ReagentPart#Temperature
Lyophilized SR-VAD-FMKPart # 6792-8C
10X Wash BufferPart # 6352-8C
10X FixitivePart # 6362-8C
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